Cover Story

| Issue 89

For the Love of the Game

Hannah Gordon’s unconventional journey from would-be sportswriter to one of the top legal positions in the National Football League is framed by her office window. Visible outside the glass in her upstairs office at the NFL’s 49ers Santa Clara headquarters is an enormous—and growing daily—structure of steel and concrete.

| Issue 88

Law and Business in Emerging Markets

When Leith Masri was helping to put together Microsoft’s first investment in the Arab world in 2002, he hit a roadblock—Jordanian law didn’t have the corporate structure Microsoft’s deal negotiators wanted. At the time, the government of Jordan recognized only two corporate forms: limited-liability companies or full-fledged publicly traded corporations.

| Issue 87

Meet Liz Magill

Liz Magill likes to run. Not too fast, but steady. It’s a good thing, too. Getting up to speed in her new job as the Richard E. Lang Professor of Law and Dean of Stanford Law School, with back-to-back appointments every day and events on most evenings, will take marathon stamina.

| Issue 86

The New JD

Today’s Stanford Law offers a wide array of opportunities to explore not only the kind of law students hope to practice but also to learn more about the kinds of clients they’ll work for and the dynamics of the world they will enter.

| Issue 86

The Stanford Challenge

This article accompanies the cover story “The New JD.” The fall 2006 Stanford Lawyer cover story had what many might have called an audacious title: “Transforming Legal Education.” If the title of that magazine story was audacious, the plan it described was perhaps more so. How do you transform an [...]

| Issue 85

Your Privacy At Risk

Phone-hacking scandals at News of The World. One lawsuit after 
another alleging privacy breaches by major companies. A backlash over body-scanning machines in airport 
security lines. It’s been a busy year for those who work at the intersection of privacy law and technology. “2011 is the year that changed privacy,” [...]

| Issue 84

Getting to Green

When Dan Reicher was 21 years old, he and three friends from Dartmouth College set out on an audacious adventure. They kayaked the entire 1,888-mile length of the Rio Grande River, paddling from Colorado to the Gulf of Mexico. “There were long stretches where we had to drag our kayaks [...]

| Issue 83

The Wrongful Convictions Seminar

Most Americans likely believe that the combined weight of “beyond a shadow of a doubt” and DNA testing would prevent innocent people from being sent to jail. But don’t be too sure. That’s the lesson students taking Lawrence C. Marshall’s Wrongful Convictions seminar have learned. Yes, it’s true, Virginia, innocent [...]

| Issue 83

Saving the Criminal Justice System

When the wheels came off the U.S. economy in late 2007, it was no wonder law enforcement leaders feared that a spike in crime would be close behind. Unemployment and home foreclosures shot up, while tax revenues to support education, substance abuse and mental health services, job training, recreation programs, [...]

| Issue 82

The Empiricists

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s proposed court-packing plan of 1937 sparked decades of debate about judicial susceptibility to outside influences. After the Supreme Court struck down crucial parts of the New Deal, the president unveiled a plan to expand the size of the bench to as many as 15 justices to gain control of the Court. Yet soon after, Justice Owen J. Roberts, a center “swing” voter, aligned his vote with liberal colleagues in a pivotal case—the so-called “switch in time that saved nine.”