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Stanford Lawyer
Civil Liberties and Law in the Era of Surveillance

Civil Liberties and Law in the Era of Surveillance

It may no longer be an exaggeration to say that big brother is watching. When Edward Snowden leaked classified government documents last year, many were surprised to learn just how much access the National Security Agency (NSA) has to the personal email and phone records of ordinary citizens.

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IP Law and Innovation with Mark A. Lemley and A. Douglas Melamed

IP Law and Innovation with Mark A. Lemley and A. Douglas Melamed

Two of IP law's top scholars and practitioners discuss recent U.S. Supreme Court cases and challenges facing the field.

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Debra Zumwalt, JD ’79; The Chief Legal Officer at the Farm

Debra Zumwalt, JD ’79; The Chief Legal Officer at the Farm

As vice president and general counsel of Stanford University, Debra Zumwalt is at the helm of a vast operation. Learn how she is helping to manage one of the world's top incubators of young talent.

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Joan Petersilia: A Life’s Work Focusing on America’s Prison Challenges

Joan Petersilia: A Life’s Work Focusing on America’s Prison Challenges

The official commendation explaining the selection of Joan Petersilia for the Stockholm Prize in Criminology begins, “Your research has provided compelling evidence on the staggering needs of American prisoners returning to their communities, and the importance of their reintegration for public safety.”

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Bright Award for Environmental Sustainability

Bright Award for Environmental Sustainability

This year’s Bright Award for Environmental Sustainability was given to Art Sterritt, who has played a critical role in establishing and protecting the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. The $100,000 international prize, now in its second year, is given annually by Stanford Law School. Judges for the prize noted that the protected ecosystem that Sterritt helped to establish accounts for a quarter of the world’s remaining coastal temperate rainforests.

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 Legal Aggregates

Women in Silicon Valley: Kleiner Perkins Discrimination Case Shows Not Much Has Changed

 

 Video and Podcast Vault

Faculty on Point | Professor Jayashri Srikantiah on Access to Justice for Detained Immigrants

 

 The Cutting Edge

SLS’s Rwanda Legal Development Project Students Meet With Key Officials in Rwandan Government

 

It was wonderful to work part-time in the library under Paul Lomio’s quiet, calm direction. I remember him saying that he became a law librarian because he wanted to help people without charging them. After an earthquake in 1989, when Stanford’s libraries closed and you couldn’t even get a newspaper, [...]

- Wendy Leibowitz

 

The facts are mixed and murky in Ellen Pao’s widely publicized sex discrimination lawsuit against Kleiner, Perkins, Caulfield & Byers, a leading Silicon Valley venture capital firm. But whatever the ultimate result, a few points are clear. The VC culture is out of touch with the realities of contemporary workplaces, [...]

Deborah L. Rhode, the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law

 

Professor Jayashri Srikantiah discusses the impact legal representation has on deportation cases and the damage prolonged detainment can have on families of illegal immigrants. Learn more about Jayashri and her scholarship.

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In December 2014, members of SLS’s Rwanda Legal Development Project (RLDP) traveled to Kigali, Rwanda with Professor Erik Jensen and Rule of Law Program Executive Director, Megan Karsh. Since 2013, RLDP has worked with various stakeholders in the Rwandan justice sector to support the government’s legal reform efforts. The purpose [...]

 
     

From the Dean

By Liz Magill

The term “epicenter” refers to the point on the Earth’s surface that is directly above the point where an earthquake or underground explosion originates.

We all know that the word epicenter is frequently used outside the context of seismic events. In fact, those who police our language grumble about its overuse.

I cannot count the number of times I have been told that Stanford University and Silicon Valley are the epicenter of the digital revolution, but I don’t think even those who are serious about the use of language should complain. It’s true, there is no surface point that can be matched to a subsurface point of disruption, but this region and this school have created something that is easily analogous to an earthquake—a shaking and shifting of the earth, with unpredictable aftershocks. Of course, it is only an analogy because, unlike seismic disasters, the digital revolution has created countless goods. But it has also created some new concerns.

Our feature story in this issue zeros in on one set of those concerns—the way in which the digital revolution has changed the relationship between the citizen and the state. The world that we now take for granted creates the possibility of wide-scale government surveillance of huge populations and the possibility that law enforcement can reach into every nook and cranny of our lives. Not surprisingly, those at Stanford Law School are at the center of many of the most pressing debates over this new reality and they are featured in our cover story.

News

Thursday, March 19

Student Researchers in Stanford Law School Practicum Recommend Smarter Ways to Manage Water

This story was written by Rob Jordan and was published March 19 on the Stanford University website as part of a series about Stanford researchers developing solutions to water supply and access challe […]
Friday, March 6

Stanford Law School to Establish First Amendment Professorship with $5 Million Gift

Stanford Law School will establish a professorship focused on the First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and freedom of the press, thanks to a $5 million gift made recently by the Stanton Foundat […]